32nd Armor Regiment

 

 

 

  Welcome to the Home of the 32nd Armor Regiment.   

"Victory or Death"

  "World War II, Cold War, Desert Storm"

 

BLAZONRY

32ND ARMORED REGIMENT

The raguly of the insignia is symbolic of the striking fire-power of an armored regiment-the yellow background indicating the cavalry branch of the service.

Updated March 16, 2011weeeeeeeeWEll 

Well its good to be back and look forward to working on the 32nd Armored pages. If you have information that needs to be added please send it to spearhead132@gmail.com and I will be sure to get it on here. God Bless…

BANDIT FOR LIFE… SPEARHEAD FOREVER…

Paul A. Smith, Association President/Chaplain

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Pat Ryan (WW2 Veteran) and Paul A. Smith (Cold War Veteran). Ft. Campbell July 2006 with the reactivated 1st Squadron 32d Cavalry. "Victory or Death"

Map Donated by Pat Ryan, A Company 32d Armored Regiment WWII

Brief WWII History

The 32nd Armored Regiment was activated 15 April, 1941 at Camp Beauregard, Louisiana as the 2nd Armored Regiment and assigned to the 3rd Armored Division. The unit was Redesignated 8 May 1941 as the 32nd Armored Regiment.

The unit moved from Camp Beauregard to Fort Polk Louisiana on 14 June, 1941. Although Fort Polk was still under construction, it was designated as the training base for the 3rd Armored Division. The Battalion received the bulk of its cadre who received basic training, began field training and learned to operate the tanks of the time.  

During Mid July of 1942,  the Division moved to the Mohave Desert for training in desert warfare. It was said that this training probably did more to toughen the Division that any other. 

In early October, 1942, the Division moved to Camp Picket, Virginia. The camp was crowded and damp and has been known to be the least favorite stop of the Battalions training.

During mid January, 1943, the Division moved to Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania. It was here that the Battalion gained the experience it would need to help it through the hard struggle in the Ardennes two years later. It was said that this stay was the favorite among the cadre even though the training was tough. 

In early August 1943, the Division was alerted for overseas service and  moved to Camp Kilmer, New Jersey. There the personal received shots, heard talks on censorship & security, and received physical examinations. On 4 September 1943, the Division boarded trains for New York Harbor. The next day, the Division was sailing for Europe.

The Battalion arrived in England and set up camp in Wiltshire-Codford. They spent their time training and preparing for D-Day.

The Battalion moved to Normandy in mid June of 1944. On 29 June 1944, the Battalion entered combat as part of Combat Command A at Villiers-Fossard. The Battalion fought on until 24 April 1945. 

The Battalion changed rolls at that time to one of occupational duty. With approximately 8.7 million displaced people in the country, There was a lot of work to do in sorting everyone out and sending them back home. 

The 32d Armored Regiment was inactivated 10 November, 1945 in Germany.

E Company, 32d Armored Regiment, March 6, 1945

                                                                                                              

Tank Commander, Robert Early

Gunner, Clarence Smoyers

Driver, WM McVey

Assistant Driver, Homer Davis

Assistant Gunner, John Dericci

*All pictures and data sent to this website become property of the Association of 3d Armored Division Veterans.

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