Personal Diarys

 

Personal Diarys

We were on a training mission at Graffenwoher when we got the word we were

going to Saudi. I had just gotten my E-5 a few days before leaving for
Graffenwoher and was NCOIC Advance Party. Either I did a good job, or he
wanted me gone, because On 6 Dec 1990, I was assigned as Advanced Party
NCOIC along with SPC Mike Jenkins and 3 others (do not remember who they
are). After landing at Dhahran, we went to Al Jabaal and was assigned to the
Big Red One. They were in a huge hangar which housed 100 persons from
varying units. Next door was the British and the base we were on was
governed by the Marines.

>
> I remember a story that a jar-head was dared to urinate on a mosque. He

did so and was summarily arrested. As the story goes, the Saudi's wanted to
decapitate him as punishment (I told my guys we werent in Germany any more
and not to piss on any buildings…EVER!)

>
> I had a good bunch of guys with me. I even got Jenkins a job at AAFEES

which really benefited us. He would set the good stuff aside for us, which
was really great since most of us did not have much time to get ready before
shipping out.

>
> Aside from ongoing training and perimiter guard, our job was to insure

that all vehicles were safe and ready for combat before the units arrived.
But all in all, it was an easy assignment. Then Jenkins was bitten by a
spider (I think he called it a Camel Spider) and lost all of his body hair
and had to go back to the rear (I never did find out if it ever grew back,
but when I returned back to Germany on 11 May '91 some was growing back)

>
> We did this by taking the vehicles off of the ships, inspecting them for

sabotage or malfunctions then all NCO's would then take turns as convoy
commander to take the vehicles in convoy about 20 miles to a staging area.
There another team took charge of the vehicles and topped them off,
performed another inspection then they were parked and awaited to be picked
up by their unit.

>
> This operation ensured that any unit slotted to arrive would have there

vehicles ready for pick up upon their arrival in country.

>
> On Jan 05 '91 the 5 of us were re-assigned to A Co 122MSB in Dammam. We

then moved out to Camp Henry.

>
> The day I arrived at Camp Henry there was a fight. One of the guys Roberts

had his protective mask ran over by Pitts. Directly after that happens the
M-8 alarm goes off Roberts didnt have a mask so SSG Oaks zipped him up in
his sleeping bag for protection. It was at that time that I knew it was
going to be a long hitch.

>
> We had pet monitor lizards and black scorpions. Someone put some hundred

mile-an-hour tape around the stinger so we could handle them without fear of
getting zapped. We would take the stinger and put it in our mouths in the
pre morning hours before it had a chance to warm itself by the sun. Once it
warmed up it would roll backwards and pinch your nostrals with its pincers.
Needless to say its hilarious to watch someone screaming like a girl when
that scorpion rolls back and grabs a peice of your nostral! I dont remember
who that happened to, but the morning we rolled out to Iraq, a couple of
guys asked me to take a picture with the scorpion in their mouths. The heat
of their breathing warmed up the scorpion enough so the last guy got a
picture of his eyes wide while he slapped at his face trying to get the
scorpion off of his nose.

>
> One day I was told I was going to be part of an advance party into Iraq. I

got SPC Robert E?. Maj Kline gave us our instructions and we headed out. We
took our position at the rear of the convoy. But there was one person
missing. Our Lt. We were told to go and he would catch up later. Enroute we
came across some infantry or MP's who told us that we were driving very
close to the front line. We had our orders and proceeded forward. A little
before nightfall we reached our destination still without the Lt. We had an
NCO meeting and decided to form a wagon wheel perimiter with our vehicles
with two persons locked and loaded with night vision goggles (NCO's were the
only ones with NVG's) we decided we would have one SOG and one guard every
1.5 hrs. There werent enough NCO's so some SPC's had to pull SOG. About 2.5
hours later, here comes the Lt. He told us that we could not stay because it
was too hot and would be moving out at first light.

>
> As soon as first light we began to head back to Camp Henry. About an hour

into the trip Maj Kline shows up and stops the convoy. He then tells
everyone that we are in a hot zone and will be following a certain route
back to Henry. He then begins to hand out copies of the map to a few people
and as he approaches me, he tells me that if any vehicle breaks down that I
cannot fix quickly, I'm suppose to make sure the driver has enough food an
ammo (NCO's had control of the ammo too) and leave them there with their
vehicle. Needless to say I didnt feel good about that, but told him 'Yes
Sir'.

>
> We were roughly 6 to 8 hours from Camp Henry and it was all cross country.

No roads. Sure enough a fuel tanker breaks down. The water pump is shot and
I'm not about to leave someone out here alone so we dump the fuel and
disable both the tanker and tractor. Now keep in mind that I'm driving an
old M-8 something 5-ton with a manual trans and a water buffalo in tow, so
driving across the roadless desert was not easy to do. I'm trying to drive
faster than the wind can erase the convoy tracks and we're doing great until
we see another vehicle stopped, at least its a 5-ton automatic.

>
> Now this truck had our food in it, and the last thing we wanted to do was

leave a bunch of food for the enemy, so we got out to see whats wrong and
then I just lost it. Both outer tires were blown on the driver side. Now I'm
really pissed. It was just two flat tires and the two people in the cab were
just sitting there either waiting for us or waiting to get shot. So sarge if
you are reading this and you get upset….oh well. Yep thats right, I said
sarge, as in Sgt E-5. The driver was a female sgt and her passenger a female
spc. I guess they didnt hear of womens rights and if they had, they sure
didnt subscribe!! We're in a freaking war zone and they're acting as if they
are back on the block waiting for AAA!

>
> Well since they just sat there waiting for us, I told them we were going

to eat lunch while they loosened the lugs and got it ready for us. Ha ha,
they didnt like that, but I wasnt about to argue with her so I embelished,
just a little bit, what Maj Kline told me and that got her moving. Since we
hadnt had breakfast we were really hungry and besides I needed to check over
my truck and make sure I wasnt going to lose the water buffalo.

>
> After about 5 minutes of watching the female version of Moe and Curly it

was obvious we werent going to have breakfast. I told Robert E ( thats what
we called him, but for some reason I dont think that was his name LOL ) and
the other guy to start breaking the lugs loose while I dropped both spares
from each truck. Needless to say the girls werent much help, but I held bit
my lip and kept a civil tongue. Then they asked how we were going to change
the tire without jacking it up………..uhm its sand, we just had to dig
enough out to put the tire on. We were done changing both tires in roughly
15 minutes. I was still furious but kept quiet.

>
> Now I had 4 people and two vehicles to get back to Camp. It was obvious we

wouldnt catch the convoy and Maj Kline didnt give me a map, so I had to use
my training from PLDC since it was still fresh in my mind it was fairly
simple. I gathered everyone around and told them of our situation. Because
Maj Kline was in such a rush to move us out I felt that we were more than
likely behind the front line and the occasional gun fire made us all
nervous. Sometimes it sounded close and other times far away, so I made the
decision that everyone would lock and load a 30 round clip.

>
> I had an idea, just an idea, of where KKMC was and since no one else was

speaking up I chose a direction, took my compass out and told Robert E to
get his out as well and fixed on a position. I'm not sure if we were in Iraq
or Saudi, but I did know we needed to go in a South by South East direction.
I set the compass and locked it and told Robert E to keep his open. If we
could get to KKMC we could get to camp. Next I told them to put one round in
the chamber, put their goggles on, roll down their window and point their
M-16 out the window. The female driver would drive with her left hand and
use her arm as a support for her weapon. The other guy we picked up
previously I put in the back and we were on our way.

>
> Robert E kept me straight by using the compass. You should have seen us

barrelling across the desert with that little water buffalo bouncing up and
down as we drove across those dunes!!! The girls were behind us simply
because I didnt know if I could rely on them to drive fast and straight. We
were hitting those dunes so hard that we actually got airborn several times.
To this day I'm amazed that that water buffalo stayed attatched let alone
upright! There were a few times we didnt know if we were being shot at or
not, but we just kept going. I know I had to have burned that clutch up, but
I'll be damned if I was going to slow down.

>
> I guess I was more amazed at the fact that we not only made it back to

Camp Henry, but we made it about an hour and a half before Maj Kline did.
You should have seen his face when I gave him my report. Damn he was furious
that maintenance had beaten him back to camp and with such a huge time
deficit!!

>
> The day we left Henry for Iraq had to be the longest day. I remember going

in circles ( I think the LTC was lost, but that is just my opinion). It was
as if we were the Keystone Kopps and didnt know what direction to move in.
Well thats one of my stories from Operation Desert Storm / Sheild.

>

Hello,

I just found the 3rd AD website and would like to say thank you, its great! I didnt even know my name was on it until just now 🙂

I just have some info for the A Co 122MSB intro page.

On 6 Dec 1990, I was assigned as Advanced Party NCOIC along with SPC Mike Jenkins and 3 others (do not remember who they are). After landing at Dhahran, we went to Al Jabaal and was assigned to the Big Red One. Our job was to insure that all vehicles were safe and ready for combat before the units arrived. 

We did this by taking the vehicles off of the ships, inspecting them for sabotage or malfunctions then all NCO's would then take turns as convoy commander to take the vehicles in convoy about 20 miles to a staging area. There another team took charge of the vehicles and topped them off, performed another inspection then they were parked and awaited to be picked up by their unit.

This operation ensured that any unit slotted to arrive would have there vehicles ready for pick up upon their arrival in country.

On Jan 05 '91 the 5 of us were re-assigned to A Co 122MSB in Dammam. We then moved out to Camp Henry.

Again, thanks,
Wm Dave Smith
Owner, www.bizfetch.net

 

 Hello sir,

 I know the 122MSB portion of the site is under construction, but after

 viewing the A Co 122d MSB  page, I noticed that Spc Angel M. Candelaria is missing from the

 Maintenance section. Candy served with me (Sgt Wm Smith), Flip (Spc Phelps), Spc Moore, Balle (Spc

 Ballesteros), Robert E (Spc  Welle) and Sgt Fields. Candy is currently a SSG with the 77RRC 301st ASG

 in NY and can be reached  at 718-352-5829.

 Also, I'd like to update your records on Sgt Ed Gilbert:

 I served with and was a good friend to Sgt Ed Gilbert, and knew Spc Mobely (who passed away

 shortly after being hit). I noticed you list Circumstances Unknown next to  Ed's name and would

 like to take a this opportunity to elaborate.

 We were told that both men had passed away in the explosion, and we held services for them a few days later.

 After the 3rd AD was disbanded I was reassigned to the Big Red 1 at Ft. Riley, KS. During my last day of orientation I look across the horseshoe formation and see someone

 with a very distingushable mustacke alot like Ed's. (depending on the day of orientation you were in depended

 on your location in the horseshoe. I was in the final day and had just recieved my unit assignment. Across from the final day formation is the 1st and 2nd day people.)

 So thinking I'll just take a look at this guy as he walks in, I stand next to the door and wait. Imagine my surprise when I discover the person is actually Sgt. Ed.

 Gilbert!! We had a quick reuinion, but promised to meet later after we had recieved our unit assignments. Ironically we

 ended up at the same duty station.

 On a visit to Ed's home, he told me what happened;

 Spc Mobely and Sgt Gilbert had somehow lost our main convoy and later met up with an engineer BTN

 and joined their convoy. As they were passing thru an uncleared mine field everyone was instructed

 not to exit their vehicles when they stopped to take a break. Mobley saw what looked like a C

 battery on the ground and picked it up. It was rather dirty so he proceeded to clean it off by tapping it on the side of the truck.

 Ed hearing the noise ran over to the other side of the truck and reached Mobely just as the bomblet went off. Both men were hit by shrapnel. Ed believes Mobely passed away soon after being struck due to his proximity of the explosion.

 Ed then tells me that the medevac chopper wouldnt land for several hours in fear of landing on a> mine even though they had cleared the field. He was later sent to a MASH unit where they worked on his injuries. To further make matters worse, his unit and his wife

 recieved news that Ed was KIA alongside Mobely. We held an impromptu funeral in the field then moved on to Kuwait.

 Ed had sustained substantial shrapnel on the right side of his body; right arm and hand was severely damaged and required several skin grafts, right leg, right testicle and some in his inner left leg, peice of shrapnel in his right eye and right side of face

 including his upper torso.

 He remained on active duty awaiting his medical evaluation, however he did walk with a limp and his right arm and hand were all but unusable. He said the doctors couldnt remove all of the shrapnel, but they had done the best they could and for the most part he would be able to lead a fairly normal life. Aside from his injuries, Ed hadnt changed much. He was still a prankster and in surprisingly good humor.

 A few months later I went on Terminal leave and later ETS'd out. I lost track of Ed, but I'd like to think he's still pulling pranks on people and that he's doing well for himself all things> considered.

Thank you

 William D. Smith, Sgt

> Alpha Co, 122MSB

>

>

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